The Miss Rumphius Project

lecieltumultueux:

Yesterday my prof struggled to find a nice way to say that only MLIS-holders understand how to offer what the users want and go the extra mile to help someone locate a book in the stacks.

MAYBE BECAUSE THERE IS NO NICE WAY TO SAY THAT. BECAUSE IT ISN’T FUCKING TRUE. A bunch of people in this…

This is the number one reason that I hated library school. They were under the mistaken impression that school would make us better librarians.

intrepidheroine:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

byjoveimbeinghumble:

soooooooo. tumblarians.

How in the hell do you pay for grad school? This is expensive as all get out, and it’s looking like I’ll have to marry for money to swing this.

I’m looking at Drexel and Chapel Hill…

I got more loans, too. Between my grad school and undergrad loans, I’ll be broke for the next ten years of my life. Yay.

text-block:

lecieltumultueux:

What advice do you have for students who want to make the most of their time in library school?

"Do not go to library school. Librarianship is a dying profession. But if you are going to go, get as much technology training as you can and get a wide array of experiences in a library so you know what you want to do and have a better understanding of how libraries work."

So basically this whole interview is saying their candidates lack technology skills and library schools don’t teach anything useful. Alright. But instead of telling us not to go to library school, maybe you should encourage us to go to library school, learn from the experience (even if all we learn is that things need to change) and then work to MAKE the changes? 

Not to mention ‘technology skills’ doesn’t tell me much. What do you want me to bring to the table? I’d already be concerned entering a library work environment where my superiors think that librarianship is dying and that makes me wonder if you want me to come in with programming skills or just be able to fix the jammed printer. Is there any support for innovative thinkers or is it seen as a waste of time? Are the librarians there just holding things together or trying new things?

It’s food for thought, certainly.  I actually appreciate this person’s candor, though like you, I’m frustrated by the vagueness:  Okay, if not library school, then what?

I’d say reports of the profession’s demise have been greatly exaggerated.

While I think it’s becoming clear that a master’s degree to begin your library career (the way I did) is becoming less and less necessary, I don’t think that translates to “Librarianship is dying.”  It just means that an old tradition about entering the professionis dying off.

It just means that librarianship is evolving— possibly to a point where the master’s degree may become less necessary unless you want to go into administration.  I still think training in librarianship principles is necessary,but I wonder if it couldn’t be done instead with certification programs, or apprenticeships, in addition to a master’s level education.  Since a lot of library work like acquisitions or cataloging or ILL is specific to the individual library, an apprenticeship may go a lot farther in teaching the “technology skills” that are so necessary, and allow for practical application of important concepts.

If someone mentions interest in librarianship as a career to me these days, I typically recommend that they seek out library work first, and then, if they find that they like the work and want to advance, look into library school.

Takeaway: Librarianship is dead; long live librarianship.

Yes, much of this.

intelligibledirigible:

librarian-shaming:


"I don’t think an MLIS is necessary to become a librarian"


Payroll disagrees.


Many of the best librarians I know don’t have MLIS degrees. And it’s true, they’re not paid as librarians. Was my MLIS helpful? Yes. Was it worth the time, money, and grief I put into it? Absolutely not. It’s a classist gateway, it measures competence at skills largely unrelated to the profession, and the system is broken.

intelligibledirigible:

librarian-shaming:

"I don’t think an MLIS is necessary to become a librarian"

Payroll disagrees.

Many of the best librarians I know don’t have MLIS degrees. And it’s true, they’re not paid as librarians. Was my MLIS helpful? Yes. Was it worth the time, money, and grief I put into it? Absolutely not. It’s a classist gateway, it measures competence at skills largely unrelated to the profession, and the system is broken.
They don’t teach witchcraft in library school. Vermin - check. Mold and mildew - check. Difficult patrons - check. But there was no course in witchcraft, no syllabus for sorcery. If only I’d been properly prepared for my first real job.

Mindy Klasky, Girl’s Guide to Witchcraft (Don Mills, Ont: Red Dress Ink, 2006)

/cackles

lecieltumultueux:

They cut out the cataloguing part of one of my courses this semester. The professor says if you want to be cataloguing, you shouldn’t be in a masters program, just be a technician instead.

Is this some weird Canadian thing or are they just nuts?

(I’ll be sure to take the separate cataloguing…

I know very few people who do cataloguing anymore, but most of them are full librarians. Your professor seems to be misinformed.

You may say: “For what purpose did I learn all these things?” But you need not fear that you have wasted your efforts; it was for yourself that you learned them.

(via fuckyeahseneca)

I have this in the queue so that it should pop up about twenty minutes before I finish my last grad school class, ever.

Google Drive freaks me out.

When I finish a huge “powerpoint” presentation for class, I want to save it three times, put it on two thumb drives, sync my external, and then email it to myself on two separate accounts.

These days, I just have to ex out of the window, and it will be there—ready for me to pluck it out of the cloud—when I get to class. Really. Really? REALLY???

I’ve been doing this for two years now, and it still makes me nervous. It just feels so wrong!

And I don’t have to save it as I write, between each slide, either. /twitch. twitch.

Edit: Question for the ages: What do we call powerpoints now that they aren’t powerpoints?

My May Day celebrations

are delayed this year. I finish grad school on the 9th. Then, I’ll dance around naked. Now, I’m writing finding aids, essays, and presentations.

Also, I turn 25 on May 4th. Celebrating that later, too.

(Yeah, my birthday is always during finals. I’m used to it. You should’ve seen my 21st. For that, we partied anyway. Our grades may or may not have suffered. Oops?)

librarean:

thelostsunprincess:

rosieramblings:

me writing essays

My entire thesis.

Every single academic book in existence. 

Counter-argument to buy another three pages: that poison?

The PowerPoint presentation that I’m putting together right now

Professor (in email): This essay is a bit rambling but...
Me (at laptop): All of my essays are a bit rambling! You've had me for two classes now. What do you expect?
Must channel general frustration with the world into productivity.

It is too late in the semester to curl up in a little ball and refuse to come out until life stops sucking.

The act of writing this paper is eating my soul.

It’s the first day of the semester.

My schedule is terrible. I don’t mean that my classes are terrible. They’re not. They’re great. Unfortunately, they’re all late afternoon and night classes. So at nine tonight I get to drive home from New Brunswick to N/W Bergen county. Plus, I’ll miss most of my choir practices. Ugh.
I’ve only had YA Materials so far. I’ve had the prof before, so I know it’ll be good. Next up is Preservation of Library and Archive Materials. I’m going into this one a bit blind, not sure what we’re covering or who the prof is. Ah well, it’s an adventure, right? Thursday will be Manuscripts and Archives. I know what we’ll be covering there, but I don’t know that professor. I thought I knew everyone in the program by now. Apparently not.
Wish me luck.

I’m still finding books here and there from my Children’s Materials class. It’s incredibly lucky that I can just delete my library fines.

Oops.

Edit: It’s okay, I’m actually allowed to do that. Perk of the job. (Just in case you were judging me really hard.)