The Miss Rumphius Project
Laura! You are Into Cataloging. Are there any textbooks/workbooks/websites for someone who did their MLIS during AACR2 and needs an RDA update/general refresher?

lecieltumultueux:

Soo I really only have bits and pieces of cataloging down at this point as I’ve mostly learned through watching other people, I’m just weirdly eager to learn more. My actual cataloging course will be in the winter semester and we’re supposed to have a great RDA guy teach it. I’m always happy to pass on our resources then. If you’re looking for stuff now, the best I can do is offer these resources that I’ve browsed through and that I know my cataloging expert (my mom haha) has used to refresh:

1. LOC RDA training materials, which is a LOT to go through but has presentations, worksheets, quizzes, etc. http://www.loc.gov/catworkshop/RDA%20training%20materials/index.html

2. RDA Toolkit online for the rules/specifics, which sadly requires a subscription, but perhaps a friend or institution has subscribed?

3. Adam Schiff’s website has really useful AACR2/RDA comparison slides, and lots of them. I learn new things best when I have examples to look at, so this is helpful for me: http://faculty.washington.edu/aschiff/

If anyone else has something to share, please add!

Yay homework!

Everyone always wants to know the answer to the same question, ‘How long do CDs last? What’s the average age?’ " Youket says. But "there is no average, because there is no average disc.

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

elegiacholiday:

Love my messy desk. Working on sending snail mail while it rains. 💌☔️

Cordella. Your desk. It is the stuff of dreams. Wow.

elegiacholiday:

Love my messy desk. Working on sending snail mail while it rains. 💌☔️

Cordella. Your desk. It is the stuff of dreams. Wow.

I hear you.

text-block:

librarianlauren:

Library staff: We need to change how we do things!

Me: Great, then we need you to change how you do X,Y, and Z.

Library staff: We don’t want to change those things.

Head. Desk.

As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London.

London and Its Dead

i read shit like this and think what could my imagination possibly have to add

like how do i write something about london that’s weirder than london already is?

(via weunderstandthelights)

Reminds me of arguing with my father on Facebook, after he was disgusted to find out that, due to its previous life as a potter’s field, there are about 20,000 corpses under what is now NYC’s Washington Square Park.

Which basically went:

(father)  ‘but it’s ICKY. They shouldn’t use it as a park!’

(me) ‘it wasn’t like those tiny Reformed Church graveyards that they could (and did) move wholesale to Brooklyn.  And it’s MANHATTAN. where else were they going to put the park?’

(father) ‘BUT IT’S ICKY THO’

And given that London is about 5 times as old as New York, I’m not surprised their version beats ours.

TL;DR- Large old cities have a certain level of intrinsic and unavoidable creep factor.

(via bibliothekara)

I am really truly obsessed with everything that is UNDER large cities like London and NYC. I just find it fascinating.

kitrona:

flyingcuttlefish:

atopfourthwall:

uvsiren:

Discworld

I really need to read/watch the Discworld stuff.

Discworld is a lot more important than people give it credit.

Everyone needs more Discworld in their lives. It’s brilliant satire that isn’t condescending, and it’s entertaining. At the same time! I really can’t express how much I love Discworld.

You can be a tremendous librarian without putting so much stress on yourself. You don’t have to be a rockstar. A much better use of your energy is trying to be the kind of librarian you’d want to work with. Put your energy into that, my friends. And try to be the kind of librarian your patrons want. Maybe that means working on your business reference skills instead of getting on an ALA committee before your 30th birthday [Editor’s note: or even before your 40th]. So be it!

catagator:

These two pictures from the director of the Ferguson Public Library and the library’s instagram are also worth sharing. 

the-library-kat:

librarianinthebuff:

This little girl at the library wrote me this card. If I ever make it big in the library world and get an office to myself I’m framing this and putting this on my wall.

Notes like these are the best thing about being a librarian.

the-library-kat:

librarianinthebuff:

This little girl at the library wrote me this card. If I ever make it big in the library world and get an office to myself I’m framing this and putting this on my wall.

Notes like these are the best thing about being a librarian.

Get To Know Your Tumblarians Tuesday: What was the first album you bought?

lecieltumultueux:

Honestly, I think mine was the Nobody’s Angel CD because they performed on Boy Meets World. I’m sure I had some singles before that, though. Singles were so cool then.

Um, it was either Savage Garden self titled or Jewel’s Pieces of You. I was fast and loose with my nine year old allowance.

Island Beach State Park with @danafyte and @jenniferrose127

Island Beach State Park with @danafyte and @jenniferrose127

Not only do we get to watch the second episode of Outlander tonight, but IT’S BEEN RENEWED FOR A SECOND SEASON!

WE GET A SECOND SEASON!

And it’ll be based in the second book, Dragonfly in Amber. So it’ll have all the characters from Dragonfly in Amber.

And you all know what that means!

/general screaming