The Miss Rumphius Project
I've seen similar sentiments from others on my dashboard and maybe even been feeling the same. Is tumblr less engaging than it used to be? Are we all itching for the next new thing? In need of new social groups? Simply needing to recommit ourselves to current followships?

librarean:

missrumphiusproject:

For me, the tumblarian community got bigger. Much bigger.

We used to all know of each other. I used to be aware of the approximate identity of everyone who followed me. I used to follow less people. I used to be able to read my whole dash every day.

And maybe I used to put in more effort.

Regardless, I feel disconnected from everyone now. There are probably multiple factors, but I mostly blame the population issue. Tumblr sold itself on connecting micro-communities, but what happens when the micro-community becomes large and unmanageable?

The next big thing. Yes, it will happen. Not yet, though.

I remember when everyone panicked because a Yahoo bought tumblr. I was not worried. Fortunately, Yahoo said they’d mostly lay off for five years. What about after that? After that, we’ll all be on the next platform. Tumblr can go the way of Facebook. It won’t matter.

Do you think we’re there yet?

I do think we should recommit ourselves for now. Not just to the users we recognize, but to getting to know new people personally, even if it can seem overwhelming.

Yes! I definitely feel this.

Maybe there’s been a diffusion of responsibility too as more people have assumed the tumblarian mantle and expected others to create content and conversations. It’s a bit like gas particles moving more slowly in a larger container.

I know for my part that I expanded into this community, made some friends, and have been largely content to be static since then. Shades of college clique-building, I suppose, but that’s no fun.

I think Ello will be interesting to watch now that it’s gaining a bit of momentum (or at least I assume it is, given that I’m learning about it). Looking at its features without having experienced them (should I ask for an invite?), it seems like a good blend of the current social media magn(ates/ets). Then again, it could just be another Google+.

So, yeah: if you’re reading this and it resonates with you, let’s talk! And for anyone not already on board, Kat is the very picture of coolness and you should consider adding her.

At your recommendation, I put my email in for an invite to Ello when you posted this. I was going to wait for it to come through before reblogging, but I’m going to step away from tumblr for a few days, and I want to respond to a few of your points first.

I’ve certainly been lazy about posting original, library related content, of late. The last few discussions I tried to start fell flat, so I stopped trying.

I’ve also felt discouraged recently about the validity and longevity of internet friendships. It’s rough.

That doesn’t mean I’m giving up. Just taking a breather on this particular account.

In the meantime, all of my followers should follow Ean. Now. He is the future of library science. I am old and bitter. ;)

sslibrarianship:

sierragnelson:

sslibrarianship:

motherfuckingshakespeare:

eighttwotwopointthreethree:

baldymonster:

cleolinda:

killjoyfeminist:

annabellioncourt:

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

Actually one of my teachers watched every single version of Romeo and Juliet with the original text in front of him to prove that this was the worst version, but to his great dismay its the most accurate film adaptation of it, with the lines closest to the original text and most similar stage direction and relayed emotions.

He proceeded to show it to us in class.

Dude, seriously.  This version is actually very accurate.

My Shakespeare professor in grad school said the same thing.

I think most Shakespeare movies are just so classy and highbrow with their gorgeous period costumes and mandatory snooty elocutionary accents that people forget how goofy this play actually is. The lines, the characters, the motivations, the babyfaced teen stars, I just… oh my god it’s all so real. I’ve heard a lot of people blast Baz Luhrmann for making such a campy adaptation and it’s just like no, you don’t understand, that was all Shakespeare.

Sometimes I wonder if the real reason it’s disliked is because it was so damn popular with teenage girls.

hey shakesankle and alltheweirdkidsinoneplace

"Sometimes I wonder if the real reason it’s disliked is because it -was so damn popular with teenage girls."

Probably since almost everything that’s popular with teenage girls is devalued and put down. I might try streaming this or something if people want to watch it? 

I loved this movie when I was a teenage girl - and after completing an honours degree in English lit and developing a deep love of Shakespeare, I still love it.

I freaking love this movie.  So fun story about me: I get really obsessed with movies and watch them over and over and over and then I memorize the lines. So freshman year when we read Romeo and Juliet, I watched this movie a million times and I memorized Romeo and Juliet.  Then I had an in class essay and we weren’t allowed to have the book, but I had quotes anyway.  My teacher was super impressed and the best part is that she HATED this movie with a passion.

sierragnelson wins English class.

cathylibrary:

lecieltumultueux:

Today’s question is inspired by the excellent answer that diebrarian gave to the same prompt last night (link here):

SUCH LIBRARY

nice cardigan

much glasses

very intellectual freedom. wow

So, what do you wish you could put on your business card?

Back when…

Most of my social media says:

Librarian. Jersey girl. Sun worshiper. Rock & roller.

I’ve found that it’s a really good self-summary.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

You know, JP was one of the first people who reached out to me when I waded into libraryland. He is truly passionate and connected and knows more about librarianship AND the American Library Association than you might suspect. He cares about new librarians and he cares about making sure our profession continues to matter in innovative ways. He has a hand in nearly every librarian movement that is making waves these days from EveryLibrary to Urban Libraries Unite to our little tumblarian collective here. Oh yeah and he has a sense of humor and a working knowledge of popular culture and likes to party. 

Have you ever voted in an ALA election? What impact could it have? What does the President of ALA do? What could the President of ALA do? Honestly, after three years in, I’m still not totally sure but I REALLY want to find out with JP at the wheel. 

This is important to me. Let me tell you why.

I met JP at my first library conference, back when I was a baby library student in NewJerseyLand. I had no clue what I was doing, or who anyone was beyond my own classmates. JP acted happy to meet me, handed me a drink for my over-frazzled nerves, asked me why I love libraries, introduced me around, and gave me tips on who to talk to and what to apply for. Within a few minutes, I knew how to navigate a conference, how to get my foot in the door, how to network, and how to collaborate.

Several state and national conferences later, I’ve realized that this is what JP does. He takes people in—especially newbies—asks them what they’re passionate about, introduces people to who can mutually help and inspire each other, encourages them to mix ideas, and everyone comes out better for it. He teaches these skills to everyone he encounters, freely and effortlessly.

It’s really kinda magical, and I just thought you all should know.

Today, I saw my future. Let’s not do that.

I’ve been looking for this image for months. Possibly closer to a year. It was on the inside of No Virginia the whole time. This is what I get for keeping my CDs in binders.

I’ve been looking for this image for months. Possibly closer to a year. It was on the inside of No Virginia the whole time. This is what I get for keeping my CDs in binders.

I've seen similar sentiments from others on my dashboard and maybe even been feeling the same. Is tumblr less engaging than it used to be? Are we all itching for the next new thing? In need of new social groups? Simply needing to recommit ourselves to current followships?

For me, the tumblarian community got bigger. Much bigger.

We used to all know of each other. I used to be aware of the approximate identity of everyone who followed me. I used to follow less people. I used to be able to read my whole dash every day.

And maybe I used to put in more effort.

Regardless, I feel disconnected from everyone now. There are probably multiple factors, but I mostly blame the population issue. Tumblr sold itself on connecting micro-communities, but what happens when the micro-community becomes large and unmanageable?

The next big thing. Yes, it will happen. Not yet, though.

I remember when everyone panicked because a Yahoo bought tumblr. I was not worried. Fortunately, Yahoo said they’d mostly lay off for five years. What about after that? After that, we’ll all be on the next platform. Tumblr can go the way of Facebook. It won’t matter.

Do you think we’re there yet?

I do think we should recommit ourselves for now. Not just to the users we recognize, but to getting to know new people personally, even if it can seem overwhelming.

Do you have any plans for the future that you're looking forward to right now? Not necessarily giant life plans. I just find myself looking forward a lot right now to get less discouraged about what I'm up to right now.

Things I’m looking forward to:

I’m taking my mom out for dinner for her birthday, tomorrow.

I’m running my first solo adult book group meeting on October 9th.

I’m starting a Sunday reference position at a new library on October 12th.

My aunt is marrying my uncle—who she’s been with for 30 years—on October 18th, for kicks.

Yesterday, my friend from MD had a layover in Manhattan on her way to Thailand. She’s going for 6 months to teach English. I couldn’t meet up with her in the city because I was working, so I tried to set her up with a friend for a blind dinner date. The scheduling didn’t work out, but they both agreed to go on the date in 6 months. I’m looking forward to the results. /evil grin

At some point before the new year, I’m visiting the rest of my undergrad friends in MD/DC/VA. If I give myself a deadline, it’ll happen. Right? Right.

Autumn hiking.

I’d be looking forward to Halloween, but I don’t have any specific plots, ahem, plans yet.

Also, I feel like I never talk to you all anymore. So please, put stuff in my ask box/fan mail tonight. Whether I know you, or not, or we’ve been tumblr stalking each other for some indeterminate amount of time. Yes.

Responding to two entirely different posts:

meta-brarian said: i was all over that section during our massive weeding project. i couldn’t stand to let that smut go to waste. so i used it to start all my summer campfires ;-)

I’m fairly sure that counts as recycling.

megkips said: I’ve found that my current HP envy 14 (twosih years old) is very reliable, and I still have my HP netbook from grad school (which I use for work these days.)

I am taking this under advisement. Thank you!

Don’t play in graveyards

sslibrarianship:

mage-cat:

brokenponycutiemark:

graveglamour:

itinerantpoet:

graveglamour:

boohooting:

graveglamour:

steakplissken:

It’s where people bury their loved ones and come to mourn them

it is not a cool picnic spot

not a place for tag

or cosplay photoshoots

don’t do it

insert-relevant-joke-here said:

As a preservationist and as a cemetery preservation specialist — which is what entitles me to comment on this with some degree of expert knowledge — there are several ways this can go.

Privately owned cemeteries that are still performing burials and selling plots often have their own rules posted. Places like Mount Auburn Cemetery and Swan Point Cemetery and Sleepy Hollow Cemetery have their own rules on photography and acceptable activities. And they’re entitled. Please, respect the rules.

But if we’re talking about historic cemeteries or cemeteries that can no longer afford to take care of themselves (ie, no more burial plots to sell), then, apart from playing tag which is just dangerous with all kinds of things sticking out of the ground, following the original poster’s recommendations is REALLY BAD.

And why is this? Well, unless the cemetery is serving the community as a positive, useful, fun, or informative place, it’s going to get abandoned, run-down, overgrown, or forgotten. It’s been shown MANY TIMES. They become havens for drug-abuse and violence. People stop going into them and that perpetuates the downward spiral of the cemetery. And then the family that DOES mourn for someone buried there is TOO AFRAID to go in, or OUTRAGED at the condition.

So what should you do? Be respectful. Go have a picnic and pick up after yourself. Go do photoshoots but don’t push/pull/sit/abuse the stones and don’t put your equipment on the stones either. Go use it for walks. Go admire the beautiful carvings. Cemeteries were always intended for use and Victorian cemeteries were meant for recreation. So USE IT. Keep it vibrant and active in your community.

Victorian cemeteries were used for recreation? Can someone please elaborate? Is that recreation like you would use a park? I of course can understand the appeal, but the idea that an entire eras cemeteries were intended for this is surprising to me.

I recommend a couple books regarding this topic:

Linden-Ward, Blanche. ”Strange but Genteel Pleasure Grounds: Tourist and Leisure Uses of Nineteenth-Century Rural Cemeteries.”  Cemeteries and Gravemarkers: Voices of American Culture. Edited  by  Richard E. Meyer. Michigan: UMI Research Press, 1989.

Rutherford, Sarah. The Victorian Cemetery. Oxford: Shire Books, 2008.

Mickey, Thomas J. (2013). America’s Romance With the English  Garden. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press.


In case you can’t tell, I’m doing my thesis on alternative use of cemeteries…

^^^^^^^  Listen to Valt on this one, gentlefolk.  Of course be respectful, but cemeteries - 19th century ones especially - have always been meant to be used by both the living and the dead.  I can think of several cemeteries I’ve been in that include benches.  That are not in any way a grave marker.  Why would there be benches in especially scenic areas of the cemetery, often a distance from actual graves, if they weren’t meant for you to sit on?  If you don’t have easy access to the books Valt mentioned, here are some webpages on the subject:

Also excellent sources! Thank you, Alex.

While I am not Valt - who has a professional pedigree I am BURNING WITH ENVY ABOUT NOW - I am the son and grandson of morticians, and grew up (so to speak) in the industry.

I can tell you that active vandalism is a crime and will hopefully get you put away. People break monuments in Seattle-area cemeteries all the time, and it’s an awful thing. 

I can also tell you that all the public cemeteries (not churchyards - different, very very different things) in King County, WA, are owned by the same company - and they have no-trespassing policies meant to reduce crime and vandalism. If you obey the open/close times, don’t bother graveside services, don’t damage anything, and are respectful of people who are there to mourn - they (the owners) *do not care* if you take photos, or have picnics, or walk around looking at things. Some places around Seattle have been formatted (landscaped and re-landscaped) specifically because famous people (hello, Bruce and Brandon Lee) are buried there and FANS come to take photos. It’s *expected*. (They’re not interred there after some JACKASS tried digging up their remains - but the cenotaphs remain.)

Don’t break stuff. Don’t bother grieving people. Look - don’t touch. But please do look - some of the graveyards are near very beautiful, undeveloped, historic and seldom-experienced parts of town. Seattle is young - but some graveyards date to the founding of the city. That wasn’t literally yesterday.

Personally, I remember my cousins and I playing hide-and-seek in cemeteries while the grown-ups visited the crypts of people we never knew. I always thought the dead there would be happy to be visited by a little life. Obviously, there is a certain amount of respect that needs to be shown, and vandalism is awful, but I don’t see why every visit must be mournful.

Yeah, I mean, be respectful, duh - but graveyards are part of our history, and are meant to be wandered through and appreciated and contemplated. Particularly the older and more ornate ones.

jackpowerx:

medievalpoc:

Over 700 Jefferson County High School students are staging walkouts and protests over proposed changes to the Advanced Placement History curriculum. According to Colorado Public Radio:

Last week, a school board member proposed that advanced placement history classes be required to promote free enterprise and patriotism and be required to avoid classroom materials that encourage social strife or civil disobedience. Two high schools in Jefferson County closed Friday after dozens of teachers called in sick in protest.

According the online petition to be delivered to the School District:

Jeffco Public School Board has just proposed a change of curriculum stating that, “Materials should not encourage or condone civil disorder, social strife or disregard of the law. Instructional materials should present positive aspects of the United States and its heritage.”

This means that important parts of our history such as the Civil Rights Movement, Native American genocide, and slavery will not be taught in public schools. If these important lessons are not taught, children will not learn from them, and what will stop them from happening again? This is a severe form of censorship intended to keep the youth ignorant and easy to manipulate. I’m hoping to get enough signatures to prove that this is a public issue, so, please, if this is important to you, please sign. Do not let our youth grow up in ignorance; we all deserve the truth!

You can sign the petition here.

You can read more articles at The Denver Post, CBS Denver (with video), and Colorado Public Radio.

Thanks to theseacaptainsdaughter for dropping a link in my inbox.

Let me repeat that one more time in case you missed it:

“Materials should not encourage or condone civil disorder, social strife or disregard of the law. Instructional materials should present positive aspects of the United States and its heritage.”

We speak in hyperbole about something being “like 1984” all the time. This - this shit right here - this is literally 1984 - rectifying of history. Erasing parts of history - things that actually happened - that those in power don’t want remembered, all in the name of preventing “civil disorder, social strife, [and] disregard of the law.”

Fuck.

This.

Shit.

The first mouse was invented in 1965, but it took until the mid-1990s for mice to be a standard computer feature. The first packet-switched network was invented in 1969, but the internet didn’t become mainstream until the late 1990s. Multitouch interfaces were first developed in the early 1980s, but didn’t become a mainstream technology until the iPhone in 2007. That suggests we shouldn’t underestimate the disruptive potential of technologies, like self-driving cars, personalized DNA testing, and Bitcoin, that seem exotic and impractical today.
libraryadvocates:

"We as librarians have worked very hard to establish ourselves as digital leaders in our communities, but the needs are increasing," says Courtney Young, president of the American Library Association, which conducted the study with the University of Maryland’s Information Policy & Access Center. "We need to continue to do more to connect poor communities — and connect them at the speeds that they need."
-excerpted from How Rural and Suburban Libraries Bridge the Digital Divide

libraryadvocates:

"We as librarians have worked very hard to establish ourselves as digital leaders in our communities, but the needs are increasing," says Courtney Young, president of the American Library Association, which conducted the study with the University of Maryland’s Information Policy & Access Center. "We need to continue to do more to connect poor communities — and connect them at the speeds that they need."

-excerpted from How Rural and Suburban Libraries Bridge the Digital Divide